Watertown High School

Public 9-12

 324 French St.
       Watertown, CT  06795-2929


 (860) 945-4810

 School Website

District: Watertown School District

SchoolDigger Rank:
72nd of 121 Connecticut High Schools


Student/teacher ratio:  12.5
Number of students:  839

Racial breakdown:

White:
84.5%
Hispanic:
7.9%
Two or more races:
2.7%
more

Free/discounted lunch recipients:  24.2%

Homes for sale View homes for sale near Watertown High School

 See top rated Connecticut high schools

 Compare Watertown High School to nearby high schools!


Performance Trends
Compare Details In 2019, Watertown High School ranked worse than 59.5% of high schools in Connecticut. (See more...)
Compare Details In 2019 the calculated Average Standard Score was 43.54. (See more...)
Student Body
Compare Details Racial makeup is: White (84.5%), Hispanic (7.9%), two or more races (2.7%). (See more...)
Compare Details 24.2% of students are receiving a free or discounted lunch. (See more...)
Teachers
Compare Details The student/teacher ratio at Watertown High School is 12.5. (See more...)
Compare Watertown High School employs 66.8 full-time teachers.
Map and boundary of Watertown High School
Schooldigger 2019 Rankings:

Watertown High School:

SchoolDigger ranks Watertown High School 72nd of 121 Connecticut public high schools. (See Watertown High School in the ranking list.)

Watertown School District:

SchoolDigger ranks Watertown School District 92nd of 153 Connecticut school districts. (See district ranking list.)

Average Parent Rating:

Read all reviews and ratings detail for Watertown High School.

What do you think?

Your rating for Watertown High School?

Rank History for Watertown High School

Compare
Year Avg Standard Score Statewide Rank Total # Ranked High Schools CT State Percentile SchoolDigger Rating
2007 61.82 101st 176 42.6%
2008 59.00 102nd 176 42.0%
2009 66.27 72nd 176 59.1%
2010 54.11 117th 186 37.1%
2011 68.04 88th 189 53.4%
2012 57.82 106th 188 43.6%
2013 65.18 90th 193 53.4%
2015 43.14 120th 196 38.8%
2016 51.41 64th 132 51.5%
2018 49.96 69th 121 43.0%
2019 43.54 72nd 121 40.5%

Data source: test scores: Connecticut State Department of Education, rankings: SchoolDigger.com

Watertown High School Test Scores
Tests: 
  
Grades: 
  
Years: 
  
Group by: 
  
District Scores: 
  
State Scores: 



Data source: Connecticut State Department of Education

Review counts

All ratings (Avg rating: 3)
33%

0%

33%

0%

33%

  

by a citizen on FaceBook
Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Open Quote Robotics club that operates within Watertown High School

Small town communities, and small town functions are always thought of to be charming upon first glance. They’re small, quaint, and supposedly humble, as the connotation goes. Small and quaint they may be, Team 237 Robotics has been anything but humble in the ways of which it approaches its numerous endeavours, and serves as a highlight of just how exclusive, contained, and even elitist at times, a small town community can be.

Before I cover some of the more overarching issues, I’m going to begin discussing some more intrinsic issues, the club has had numerous examples of elitist behaviour promoted by both its members and the inherent design of it. Let’s begin with the seniority system. The seniority system restricts authority to only the highest grade-level peers, ensuring seniors always hold top authority regardless of general ability. You have to have stayed in the club for four consecutive years, or your seniority is effectively tarnished and you’re far less likely to achieve automatic seniority benefits within the club. This system forces new members to the club to demonstrate their ‘dedication’ by being assigned trivial jobs for the first year or even two years of their time at the club, which ultimately can dissuade new members due to the dismissive nature of the senior leaders and the rather resolute way in which they are forced into jobs.

Always ones to impress, there was a previous attempt at adopting an electoral system into the club that allowed the ability for lower grade levels to obtain activities, benefits, or responsibilities similar to those of a high seniority level, however it was eventually dismissed. An electoral system, or at least mind-set, would have encouraged the club to become more group oriented. After pressuring and not entirely honest tactics were used by upcoming seniors to influence and promote their ‘rightful seniority’ from being threatened as it were, the previous leader was forced to step down. The new leaders had then entirely abolished the electoral system, content with their power and ability to command others that they had waited and counted on since, presumably, their freshman year at Team 237 Robotics.

Drawing back to previous points, the ‘robotic’ nature of which members are handled is not entirely uninfluenced or equal to all who participate in the club, which doesn’t sound like an immediate issue at first, but one must realise the following if they consider this club: Those who donate money will be given special treatment and exemptions, those whose parents are involved with the school or the club will be able to conduct executive meddling as necessary and will hold authority regardless.

Let us not forget that there are numerous activities that can be mandated by the seniority leaders, such as meetings, fundraisers, and so forth. Failure to attend will not always result in consequences, depending on your seniority, status, and whether or not anybody of higher seniority wants you gone. In a modern school that’s taken some form a stance against bullying… why is such an archaic seniority system present in such heavy effect?

Eventually, one must come to the decision of attending a club. Membership since new leadership and recent dramatic debacles has caused this club to lost popularity among students quickly, and the harsher nature of the new leaders has forced it to once again experience a drought of members. What this club realises is that it is not a luxury for the town, its existence is not beneficial or desirable to the town, and its existence is not something the town needs to be expected to uphold. It should not use aristocratic walls to bar itself from the common citizen, and it needs to be more open to the concepts of paying for goods, gauging proper advertisement and employment for those positions that cannot be covered by students, and become more open to the concept of being truly humble to the townspeople. Additionally, when it comes to new practises not yet made widespread in smaller towns, the club needs smart individuals and perhaps aid to be caught up with the times.

Yet, despite this message having been conveyed before, it has been dismissed as irrelevant simply due to the speaker, solidifying the issue of this club’s self-image. Possible improvements would be revamping the seniority system into a socialist process (which is more effective on small scales, especially when everyone should know of each other, like a school setting- in that instance one’s desired seniority may even come to fruition if they are determined to be legitimately intelligent enough to hold it by the members.), learning proper advertising and modern publication tactics. A flyer of theirs said to visit their site at one point, only for it to be down upon visit, which was quite questionable.

I personally would not recommend this club under any circumstances until it improves. Close Quote



Enrollment information for Watertown High School

Compare
Year White African American Asian Hispanic American Indian Pacific Islander Two or More Races Not Specified Total
1988 855 10 5 4 0 n/a n/a 0 874
1989 774 7 3 2 0 n/a n/a 0 786
1990 719 9 5 4 n/a n/a n/a 1 737
1991 723 10 11 6 0 n/a n/a 0 750
1992 767 12 14 6 0 n/a n/a 0 799
1993 757 14 10 9 0 n/a n/a 0 790
1994 794 11 10 11 0 n/a n/a 0 826
1995 803 15 8 16 0 n/a n/a 0 842
1996 803 15 8 16 0 n/a n/a 0 842
1997 848 15 5 17 1 n/a n/a 0 886
1998 871 14 4 18 4 n/a n/a 0 911
1999 882 15 5 17 4 n/a n/a 0 923
2000 879 9 8 19 4 n/a n/a 0 919
2001 847 12 15 27 4 n/a n/a 0 905
2002 880 11 23 21 2 n/a n/a 0 937
2003 880 11 23 21 2 n/a n/a 0 937
2004 887 16 22 19 4 n/a n/a 0 948
2005 886 16 23 21 6 n/a n/a 0 952
2006 704 16 20 20 6 n/a n/a 0 766
2007 912 19 17 27 8 n/a n/a 0 983
2008 915 20 19 28 8 n/a n/a 0 990
2009 913 14 15 31 7 n/a n/a 0 980
2010 918 17 15 30 6 n/a n/a 0 986
2011 908 20 22 40 5 0 6 0 1001
2012 858 17 27 37 5 0 13 0 957
2013 823 21 26 36 3 0 19 0 928
2014 751 27 25 52 3 0 24 0 882
2015 744 25 20 44 3 0 25 0 861
2016 729 22 20 61 3 0 25 0 860
2017 709 20 18 66 3 n/a 23 0 839

Data source: National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Dept of Education.

About Enrollment/Ethnicity
For more information about how the Department of Education defines ethnicity, see Defining Race and Ethnicity Data, National Center for Education Statistics

Students eligible for free or discounted lunch at Watertown High School

Compare
Year # Students Full-time Teachers Student/Teacher ratio % Free/Discounted Lunch
1988 874 77.0 11.3 n/a
1989 786 74.7 10.5 n/a
1990 737 64.7 11.3 n/a
1991 750 65.3 11.4 n/a
1992 799 64.6 12.3 4.5
1993 790 62.4 12.7 0.3
1994 826 61.4 13.5 5.2
1995 842 59.1 14.2 7.0
1996 842 59.1 14.2 7.0
1997 886 63.8 13.9 4.2
1998 911 65.6 13.9 2.9
1999 923 65.9 14.0 6.5
2000 919 66.8 13.8 7.7
2001 905 64.2 14.1 n/a
2002 937 72.8 12.9 6.4
2003 937 72.8 12.9 6.4
2004 948 71.7 13.2 6.4
2005 952 61.9 15.4 n/a
2006 766 59.9 12.8 13.1
2007 983 63.5 15.5 10.0
2008 990 73.2 13.5 10.9
2009 980 73.5 13.9 13.5
2010 986 75.5 13.0 16.0
2011 1001 72.7 13.7 15.8
2012 957 72.1 13.2 15.3
2013 928 69.9 13.2 19.9
2014 882 68.0 12.9 22.8
2015 861 63.0 13.6 24.4
2016 860 67.0 12.8 24.4
2017 839 66.8 12.5 24.2

Data source: National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Dept of Education.

About Students eligible for discounted/free lunch
For information about the National School Lunch Program, see the USDA Website

Student/Teacher Ratio Watertown High School

Compare
Year # Students Full-time Teachers Student/Teacher ratio % Free/Discounted Lunch
1988 874 77.0 11.3 n/a
1989 786 74.7 10.5 n/a
1990 737 64.7 11.3 n/a
1991 750 65.3 11.4 n/a
1992 799 64.6 12.3 4.5
1993 790 62.4 12.7 0.3
1994 826 61.4 13.5 5.2
1995 842 59.1 14.2 7.0
1996 842 59.1 14.2 7.0
1997 886 63.8 13.9 4.2
1998 911 65.6 13.9 2.9
1999 923 65.9 14.0 6.5
2000 919 66.8 13.8 7.7
2001 905 64.2 14.1 n/a
2002 937 72.8 12.9 6.4
2003 937 72.8 12.9 6.4
2004 948 71.7 13.2 6.4
2005 952 61.9 15.4 n/a
2006 766 59.9 12.8 13.1
2007 983 63.5 15.5 10.0
2008 990 73.2 13.5 10.9
2009 980 73.5 13.9 13.5
2010 986 75.5 13.0 16.0
2011 1001 72.7 13.7 15.8
2012 957 72.1 13.2 15.3
2013 928 69.9 13.2 19.9
2014 882 68.0 12.9 22.8
2015 861 63.0 13.6 24.4
2016 860 67.0 12.8 24.4
2017 839 66.8 12.5 24.2

Data source: National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Dept of Education.

About Student-Teacher Ratio
Student/teacher ratio is calculated by dividing the total number of students by the total number of full-time equivalent teachers. Please note that a smaller student/teacher ratio does not necessarily translate to smaller class size. In some instances, schools hire teachers part time, and some teachers are hired for specialized instruction with very small class sizes. These and other factors contribute to the student/teacher ratio. Note: For private schools, Student/teacher ratio may not include Pre-Kindergarten.




Rate Watertown High School!

Homes for sale near Watertown High School:







Sign up for updates!

Be the first to know when there is an update for Watertown High School!





SchoolDigger data sources: National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Census Bureau and the Connecticut State Department of Education.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS: Not all boundaries are included. We make every effort to ensure that school and district boundary data are up-to-date. But it's important to note that these are approximations and are for general informational purposes only. To verify legal descriptions of boundaries or school locations, contact your local tax assessor's office and/or school district.





Diagnostics