Wood-Gormley Elementary

Public K-6

 141 East Booth St
       Santa Fe, NM  87501


 (505) 467-2003

 School Website

District: Santa Fe Public Schools

SchoolDigger Rank:
7th of 383 New Mexico Elementary Schools


Student/teacher ratio:  15.2
Number of students:  381

Racial breakdown:
White:
53.3%
Hispanic:
34.6%
Asian:
7.3%
Free/discounted lunch recipients:  28.1%

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 Compare Wood-Gormley Elementary to nearby elementary schools!
We updated the 2017-18 rankings and test scores for this school on Tuesday, August 21, 2018.


Performance Trends
Compare Details In 2018, Wood-Gormley Elementary ranked better than 98.2% of elementary schools in New Mexico. It also ranked first among 19 ranked elementary schools in the Santa Fe Public Schools District! (See more...)
Compare Details In 2018 the calculated Average Standard Score was 96.52. (See more...)
Student Body
Compare Details Racial makeup is: White (53.3%), Hispanic (34.6%), Asian (7.3%). (See more...)
Compare Details 28.1% of students are receiving a free or discounted lunch. (See more...)
Teachers
Compare Details The student/teacher ratio at Wood-Gormley Elementary is 15.2. 18 elementary schools in the Santa Fe Public Schools District have better student/teacher ratios. (See more...)
Compare Wood-Gormley Elementary employs 25 full-time teachers.
Map of Wood-Gormley Elementary
Schooldigger 2018 Rankings:

Wood-Gormley Elementary:

SchoolDigger ranks Wood-Gormley Elementary 7th of 383 New Mexico public elementary schools. (See Wood-Gormley Elementary in the ranking list.)

Santa Fe Public Schools:

SchoolDigger ranks Santa Fe Public Schools 64th of 103 New Mexico school districts. (See district ranking list.)


What do you think?

Your rating for Wood-Gormley Elementary?

Rank History for Wood-Gormley Elementary

Compare
Year Avg Standard Score Statewide Rank Total # Ranked Elementary Schools NM State Percentile SchoolDigger Rating
2005 96.14 12th 389 96.9%
2006 94.88 13th 390 96.7%
2007 92.61 18th 398 95.5%
2008 93.78 13th 405 96.8%
2009 90.77 21st 411 94.9%
2010 89.15 22nd 419 94.7%
2011 94.91 15th 402 96.3%
2012 97.70 4th 398 99.0%
2013 98.67 1st 412 99.8%
2014 97.61 1st 442 99.8%
2015 99.65 2nd 421 99.5%
2016 99.63 2nd 410 99.5%
2017 98.08 3rd 374 99.2%
2018 96.52 7th 383 98.2%

Data source: test scores: New Mexico Public Education Department, rankings: SchoolDigger.com

Wood-Gormley Elementary Test Scores
Tests: 
  
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Data source: New Mexico Public Education Department

Review counts

All ratings (Avg rating: 3.5)
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by a parent
Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Open Quote Strong principal, great teachers, very active parent-teacher organization that raises money to support music (band, chorus), the arts, PE, library and more! I have two children (2nd and 4th graders) that have had very good experiences since Kindergarten. Great teacher communication with parents. Only complaint is pressure to be on time (3 tardies = detention) and focus on testing that you find at every public school these days. Close Quote


by a parent
Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Open Quote Ask most anyone in Santa Fe which elementary school is the best, and resoundingly you’ll hear “Wood-Gormley.” WG is located in an affluent part of Santa Fe and even educates some celebrity children. When I moved into that part of town, I was naturally giddy. How awesome my child would be schooled at the best.

Best. Best based on which qualifications? The answer depends on your awareness of public education and how children learn.

By WG’s own admission on the SFPS website, its strong parent involvement is what makes it special and based on what I’ve seen, that’s true. Parents are always happily contributing. So, what else makes it special or even the best?

Here is where educational points-of-view may vary. Let me ask:

Is student achievement, rigorous core academics, high test scores, Nationally Certified teachers, uniformity, high levels of homework, and an overall serious demeanor important aspects of a good education in your reality?

OR

Is student empowerment, hands-on learning, experiential classes, creative expression, joy in learning, relaxed teachers, and encouragement for independent thinking aspects that fit your ideal?

If the former is your target, Wood-Gormley may be a good fit for you. If the latter describes your idea of good learning, keep looking.

GW’s principal, Dr. Linda Bassett, seems to be a finely tuned yes-man for federal regulation and district pressure. She aligns and agrees with rigorous core academic programming, places heavy significance on student performance with standardized tests, pushes strict adherence to uniform policy, and she demands perfect attendance.

Perfect attendance? Most of these children come from the well-educated, successful elite faction of Santa Fe. Rather than learning about places in a book, they take their children to these places. Rather than acquiring Spanish in a classroom, they take their children to Chile and enroll them in schools there for a few months. Does Dr. Bassett know her population? Many of these kids miss school because they’re traveling the world. She’d rather they stay put in a classroom with over-worked, agitated teachers handling more kids than the room can hold?

Uniforms. Euphemistically called “dress code.” All Santa Fe Public School children must follow clothing regulation. Think about this: Where through history and up to present time are uniforms worn? With what population of people? Well, people who need to be behaviorally stripped down and put into place. People who need to have their individuality removed and who need to be programmed to be, act, speak, and think in a predetermined manner. Is that what you desire for your child?

SFPS trains students to be just the same as everyone around them. Don’t be different, don’t step out of line, don’t grow too big. Think about the most successful people in the world ~ Donald Trump, Oprah, Richard Branson. Would they have gotten to where they are today remaining small like everyone else? In my home, middle management is not the communicated status quo. Entrepreneurship & running the show is our target. What makes a great education is a school who empowers my child to think big, to create, to generate, and to institute change, success, and confidence. A know-how to find out more when necessary. Wood-Gormley is training for middle management robots. Yes-men who do what they’re told.

From what I can see, WG is getting by on its outdated reputation and those afore mentioned parents. It’s not focused on its own population & demographics, but rather a one-size-fits all educational structure. One size does not and will never fit all.

Since when did education become such a serious job that our children needed to begin at age five? What’s the value in over-testing, grinding teacher knuckles to the bone, and being so ridiculously serious? Is this structure working?

It surprises me a place known for its creative thinking and artistic values would behold an education system such as SFPS. And it surprises me WG wouldn't have a little leeway within the confines of SFPS considering it's doing just fine score-wise.

My child will be attending a private Montessori school soonish. Hopefully before too much mediocrity sets in. Close Quote


Enrollment information for Wood-Gormley Elementary

Compare
Year White African American Asian Hispanic American Indian Pacific Islander Two or More Races Not Specified Total
1990 235 0 7 115 6 n/a n/a 0 363
1991 240 0 6 91 2 n/a n/a 0 339
1992 190 1 7 99 2 n/a n/a 0 299
1993 204 0 4 80 3 n/a n/a 0 291
1994 211 0 6 81 14 n/a n/a 0 312
1995 238 0 6 78 2 n/a n/a 0 324
1996 238 0 6 78 2 n/a n/a 0 324
1997 241 3 6 77 5 n/a n/a 0 332
1998 220 4 17 78 2 n/a n/a 0 321
1999 246 2 25 78 4 n/a n/a 0 355
2000 265 4 13 91 4 n/a n/a 0 377
2001 239 4 7 106 6 n/a n/a 0 362
2002 235 3 2 117 7 n/a n/a 0 364
2003 235 3 2 117 7 n/a n/a 0 364
2004 234 3 1 113 5 n/a n/a 0 356
2005 225 2 3 118 5 n/a n/a 0 353
2006 238 4 4 127 7 n/a n/a 0 380
2007 235 3 6 125 7 n/a n/a 0 376
2008 230 4 10 116 5 n/a n/a 0 365
2009 224 3 14 121 6 n/a n/a 0 368
2010 234 5 15 129 6 0 0 0 389
2011 242 4 20 140 12 0 0 0 418
2012 237 6 21 139 11 4 2 0 420
2013 248 6 20 145 14 4 2 0 439
2014 240 2 17 140 15 2 5 0 421
2015 215 4 20 122 12 2 2 0 377
2016 203 6 28 132 9 2 1 0 381

Data source: National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Dept of Education.

About Enrollment/Ethnicity
For more information about how the Department of Education defines ethnicity, see Defining Race and Ethnicity Data, National Center for Education Statistics

Students eligible for free or discounted lunch at Wood-Gormley Elementary

Compare
Year # Students Fulltime Teachers Student/Teacher ratio % Free/Discounted Lunch
1990 363 19.6 18.5 n/a
1991 339 17.9 18.9 n/a
1992 299 16.4 18.2 n/a
1993 291 16.4 17.7 n/a
1994 312 16.5 18.9 n/a
1995 324 19.5 16.6 n/a
1996 324 19.5 16.6 n/a
1997 332 17.3 19.2 n/a
1998 321 13.5 23.8 n/a
1999 355 21.0 16.9 9.3
2000 377 21.7 17.4 11.1
2001 362 23.4 15.5 11.0
2002 364 22.8 16.0 10.7
2003 364 22.8 16.0 10.7
2004 356 24.0 14.8 12.6
2005 353 22.4 15.8 12.7
2006 380 22.2 17.1 12.4
2007 376 23.7 15.9 10.4
2008 365 22.6 16.2 15.6
2009 368 22.2 16.6 15.8
2010 389 21.6 18.0 21.1
2011 418 22.3 18.7 23.0
2012 420 22.9 18.3 18.8
2013 439 23.8 18.4 24.8
2014 421 24.3 17.3 24.0
2015 377 23.0 16.3 27.1
2016 381 25.0 15.2 28.1

Data source: National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Dept of Education.

About Students eligible for discounted/free lunch
For information about the National School Lunch Program, see the USDA Website

Student/Teacher Ratio Wood-Gormley Elementary

Compare
Year # Students Fulltime Teachers Student/Teacher ratio % Free/Discounted Lunch
1990 363 19.6 18.5 n/a
1991 339 17.9 18.9 n/a
1992 299 16.4 18.2 n/a
1993 291 16.4 17.7 n/a
1994 312 16.5 18.9 n/a
1995 324 19.5 16.6 n/a
1996 324 19.5 16.6 n/a
1997 332 17.3 19.2 n/a
1998 321 13.5 23.8 n/a
1999 355 21.0 16.9 9.3
2000 377 21.7 17.4 11.1
2001 362 23.4 15.5 11.0
2002 364 22.8 16.0 10.7
2003 364 22.8 16.0 10.7
2004 356 24.0 14.8 12.6
2005 353 22.4 15.8 12.7
2006 380 22.2 17.1 12.4
2007 376 23.7 15.9 10.4
2008 365 22.6 16.2 15.6
2009 368 22.2 16.6 15.8
2010 389 21.6 18.0 21.1
2011 418 22.3 18.7 23.0
2012 420 22.9 18.3 18.8
2013 439 23.8 18.4 24.8
2014 421 24.3 17.3 24.0
2015 377 23.0 16.3 27.1
2016 381 25.0 15.2 28.1

Data source: National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Dept of Education.

About Student-Teacher Ratio
Student/teacher ratio is calculated by dividing the total number of students by the total number of full-time equivalent teachers. Please note that a smaller student/teacher ratio does not necessarily translate to smaller class size. In some instances, schools hire teachers part time, and some teachers are hired for specialized instruction with very small class sizes. These and other factors contribute to the student/teacher ratio. Note: For private schools, Student/teacher ratio may not include Pre-Kindergarten.




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SchoolDigger data sources: National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Census Bureau and the New Mexico Public Education Department.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS: Not all boundaries are included. We make every effort to ensure that school and district boundary data are up-to-date. But it's important to note that these are approximations and are for general informational purposes only. To verify legal descriptions of boundaries or school locations, contact your local tax assessor's office and/or school district.





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